Benefits Denied Request Reconsideration

If You’re Denied Social Security Disability Benefits

Learn what to do if you’re denied Social Security Disability.

It’s very common for people to be denied Social Security benefits. In some cases, these individuals set themselves up for a lot of frustration by simply reapplying for the same benefits over and over again and never getting anywhere with it. It’s much more likely that your benefits will get approved if you follow the process built into the Social Security disability application structure. In fact, more people get approved than get disapproved if they follow the process all the way to the third step.

After you get turned down the first time – and it’s not a bad idea to anticipate getting turned down the first time – you file a request for reconsideration. This is a fairly quick process, at least compared to the amount of time involved in the initial application. The request for reconsideration involves another examiner taking a look at your Social Security application and determining whether or not they think it should be approved. They will use all of the evidence already gathered by the first examiner and, therefore, the process is a bit faster. If you’re turned down at this phase, you move onto the next phase, which has some significant advantages over the anonymous applications.

An administrative law judge will hear your claim if you make an appeal. Having a Waukegan Social Security disability attorney there to help can be of great benefit. This gives you a chance to present your evidence in person. Well over half of the people that actually go through this entire process get their disability claims approved. Most of the time, however, people simply keep applying and applying over and over again and fail to make any progress at all. Following the process makes it much more likely that you’ll get a face-to-face meeting with the person responsible for deciding your claim and that you will, in the end, receive the benefits for which you are applying because of your disability.